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Cloudy. Slight chance of a rain shower. Low 52F. Winds light and variable.
Updated: September 20, 2022 @ 2:28 am
As the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Color Guard posts the colors, American citizens-to-be place their hands on their hearts for the Pledge of Allegiance during a naturalization ceremony on Monday at the Strawbery Banke Museum.
Daniel Lynch, the Clerk of the Court for the U.S. District Court for the District of New Hampshire, administers the Oath of renunciation and Allegiance to 72 new American citizens during a naturalization ceremony on Monday at the Strawbery Banke Museum.
During a naturalization ceremony on Monday at the Strawbery Banke Museum, Irene Wolanyk stands when her native country, Ukraine, is called.
Soon-to-be American citizens during a naturalization ceremony on Monday at the Strawbery Banke Museum.

As the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Color Guard posts the colors, American citizens-to-be place their hands on their hearts for the Pledge of Allegiance during a naturalization ceremony on Monday at the Strawbery Banke Museum.
At the first Independence Day naturalization ceremony at Strawbery Banke Museum since the COVID-19 pandemic, 72 people became American citizens.
Irene Wolanyk, a native of Lviv, Ukraine, and a medical interpreter, said becoming an American citizen was “wonderful.”
She has lived in the United States for five years, the last three in Manchester with her husband, Nathan.
Wolanyk, who speaks Ukrainian and Russian, said she looked forward to exercising “both rights and responsibilities” now afforded to her as an American.
Daniel Lynch, the Clerk of the Court for the U.S. District Court for the District of New Hampshire, administers the Oath of renunciation and Allegiance to 72 new American citizens during a naturalization ceremony on Monday at the Strawbery Banke Museum.
During a naturalization ceremony on Monday at the Strawbery Banke Museum, Irene Wolanyk stands when her native country, Ukraine, is called.
She said life in New Hampshire is “very good” and that the Granite State was easy to get used to because it was more like Ukraine than California, where she and Nathan got married and lived for two years.
When the program emcees asked each citizen-to-be to stand and be recognized for their country of origin, Wolanyk got the loudest and longest cheer, acknowledging the honor with waves to the upbeat crowd.
The naturalization ceremony in Portsmouth was a special session of the U.S. District Court for the District of New Hampshire in partnership with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
It was presided over by the Honorable Landya McCafferty, U.S. District Court Chief Judge, who was joined by the Honorable James Bassett of the state Supreme Court.
Lawrence Yeardon, president of Strawbery Banke Museum, said the venue has hosted about 20 naturalization ceremonies.
He added that the first settlers to New Hampshire came to Portsmouth and were followed by immigrants who had “a variety of cultures, beliefs,” but who worked together.
After Daniel Lynch, the clerk of the court for the U.S. District Court for the District of New Hampshire administered the oath of allegiance, McCafferty addressed the new citizens as “my fellow Americans,” and said that on behalf of the court, “I am happy to welcome each and every one of you.”
“You have earned your right to be American citizens. You each now share a birthday with your new country,” said McCafferty.
While every new citizen had “your own reason for seeking citizenship,” McCafferty continued, “We are all Americans” and are a people defined “by the fact of citizenship.”
Soon-to-be American citizens during a naturalization ceremony on Monday at the Strawbery Banke Museum.
She reminded the new citizens and their hundreds of well-wishers that “we are a nation of immigrants,” where 98% of the population can trace their roots to a place outside the U.S.
Now, “as citizens of the United States, you have power, privileges and responsibilities,” said McCafferty, urging the new citizens to actively participate in society.
U.S. Sen Jeanne Shaheen told the country’s newest citizens that “you make the country stronger” while also contributing to U.S. leadership around the world through the championing of democratic values.
First District Congressman Chris Pappas said the path that led the new citizens to Monday’s naturalization ceremony was not an easy one. While there are some who think “democracy’s time” has come and gone, the U.S. remains “a beacon of hope to billions of people around the world,” said Pappas.
In addition to Ukraine, the new citizens who swore the Oath of Renunciation and Allegiance on Monday came from Albania, Bhutan, Brazil, Cameroon, Canada, China, Colombia, Cuba, Democratic Republic of Congo, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, France, German, Greece, Haiti, India, Iran, Ireland, Jordan, Liberia, Malaysia, Mexico, Nepal, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, United Kingdom, Venezuela and Vietnam.
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